Tag Archives | economics

2012 Asset Class Returns as of 11/30

Who would have guessed it? Which major investment class is up more than 30% as of 11/30? The answer: International Real Estate. It’s the best performing investment class of the year. Ask yourself, “Who was predicting that at the beginning of the year?” The point is not to suggest that successful investing requires predicting which […]

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My Excellent Adventure…

I recently had the honor of being invited to speak at a The Raymond James Investment Conference in London and the Science of Investing Conference In Dusseldorf. At both conferences, I had the opportunity to share my experiences as an investment advisor over the last 28 years. The trip was one of the best experiences […]

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Bringing Investors Perspective on the Presidential Election Cycle

The following is a guest post from Dr Glenn Freed and Dr Andrew Berkman. ‘Tis the Season to Vote With both parties’ conventions recently behind us, many investors have now turned their attention to the impact that new presidential policy might have on the overall stock market. The press has been questioning how the outcome […]

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In Search of Higher Returns?

    1.8% That’s all you can expect to earn over the next ten years if you invest in Ten Year US Treasury Notes. Doesn’t seem very attractive to you? You aren’t alone. These days, investors are searching for ways to increase the yield on their portfolios. In the bond market, there are two basic ways […]

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Fear, Greed and Investment Decision Making

Fear and greed cause investors to make bad decisions. Meir Statman is a pioneer in behavioral finance, the branch of economics that considers the influence of emotions on investor decision making. We had the opportunity to interview Meir after seeing his presentation at a recent conference. Among other things, he discussed: How framing and hindsight […]

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